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VICTOR JOSEPH MORCOMBE


 
Date
Comments
Born 14-Dec-1911 Pembroke Dock
Christened    
Married #1 7-July1934 British Consulate General in Cairo, Egypt
Married #2    
Died 12-Sep-1993 Bournemouth

CHILDREN (MARRIAGE #1)

 
Born
Died
Comments
Patricia Morcombe 1935   Pembroke Dock
Peter Morcombe 1937   Pembroke Dock

CHILDREN (MARRIAGE #2)

 
Born
Died
Comments
Clare Morcombe 1952   Bishop's Stortford

Victor Joseph married Winifred Agnes Bull in 1934. He started a motor business in London Road, Pembroke Dock in 1935 and lived next door. Two children were born there, Patricia Haley in 1935 and Peter Haley in 1937.

At the outset of the World War II, Victor was a Lieutenant (Reserve) in the 3rd Royal Tank Regiment. He was captured at Dunkirk in 1940 and spent 5 years in German prison camps such as Oflag VIIb. After the war, he returned to Pembroke Dock still as a Lieutenant. He transferred to the REME (Royal Electrical & Mechanical Engineers) and retired with the rank of Lt. Colonel in 1958.

Winifred and Victor were divorced at the Nottingham District Registry in 1947. Two years later he was living in Ealing, London when he married Agatha Ruth Rothberger (Mady) in the Marylebone Registry Office. They had one daughter, Clare who was born in 1952 at Bishop's Stortford, Essex. Until Victor's retirement from the Army they lived in exotic places including Libya, the Gold Coast (now Ghana), and West Pakistan. For two years they lived in Arborfield, Berkshire.

On Victor's retirement from the Army, he moved to Mill Hill, in North London, where Victor worked as a senior lecturer at the Hendon Technical College (now North Western University). Shortly after retiring at age 65, they moved to Bournemouth. Victor started a third career managing old people's homes. Finally, he retired in 1989, before his 79th birthday.

In September 1993 I was visiting my mother in Torremolinos together with Ines and PJ when Mady called to say that Dad was very ill so I flew to Bournemouth fearing the worst. When I got there Dad played it all down saying there was nothing to make a fuss about. To prove it he enjoyed a very dry Martini and then won five out of six cribbage games. The following day I flew back to Spain only to be met at the airport by my mother who told me that Dad had died of a heart attack that morning.

 

 

©2007 Peter H. Morcombe
Last update: 17-Jun-2007